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Types of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD)

Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a mental illness in which persons experience recurrent, unwelcome emotions, ideas, or feelings (obsessions) that cause them to feel compelled to do something again and again (compulsions). Washing hands, checking on objects, and cleaning is examples of repeated habits that can greatly disrupt a person’s everyday tasks and interpersonal relationships.

TYPES OF OBSESSIVE-COMPULSIVE DISORDERS

Although all subtypes of OCD share symptoms, how these symptoms manifest in daily life varies greatly from person to person. OCD sufferers might have several subtypes, and their subtypes can shift over time. OCD exists in various subtypes and varies from person to person.  Following are the sub-types of OCD:

HARM OCD

Harm OCD causes people to fear that they might hurt or kill others. And for some, the concern is not that they would injure someone, but that their loved ones will be harmed in some way. For example, someone may be preoccupied with the possibility that their child would be injured in a vehicle accident.

COMMON OBSESSIONS AND COMPULSIONS

 

  • I could stab anyone
  • What would happen if I drove over someone?
  • What if I kill someone?
  • Difficulty in standing near train tracks
  • Keeping all sharp objects hidden somewhere safe
  • Calling your loved ones to check if they are safe

SEXUAL ORIENTATION OCD (SO-OCD)

SO-OCD is a subtype of OCD marked by obsessive thoughts and compulsions centered on a person’s sexual orientation. The term gay OCD (H-OCD) has been used, although it is becoming less popular owing to its lack of sensitivity. People with SO-OCD have intrusive thoughts and cravings concerning their real sexual orientation, which they deny or are unsure of. Someone with SO-OCD may be afraid of being mistaken for a specific sexual orientation, such as homosexual or straight.

COMMON OBSESSIONS AND COMPULSIONS

  • My male buddies make me feel more at ease than my female pals. Is this a sign that I’m gay?
  • What if I’m homosexual and don’t realize it?
  • What if I’m straight and don’t care about my partner?
  • What if I’m not aware that I’m bisexual? What if I found out and my relationship was wrecked as a result?
  • They could avoid going to the gym if they’ve seen beautiful people before and had obsessive thoughts about their sexual orientation.
  • Avoid certain friends and gatherings to ignore their sexual obsessions.
  • They may date obsessively to validate their sexual orientation. This is a way for the individuals to comfort themselves and alleviate the worry caused by their anxious thoughts.

PEDOPHILE OCD (POCD)

Pedophile OCD (POCD) is a kind of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) in which a person’s obsessions are unwelcome irrational thoughts, pictures, or desires involving pedophiles, the individual is compelled to engage in compulsions to relieve worry, prevent anything horrible from happening, or ensure that they are not a pedophile, among other things. A woman, for example, can have unwanted sexually invasive thoughts about her baby (obsession) and consequently avoid touching or playing with her kid (compulsion) because she is scared of the ideas.

COMMON OBSESSIONS AND COMPULSIONS

 

  • What if I’m a child molester?
  • What if I am a pedophile? 
  • What if I have feelings for a pedophile
  • What if I’m attracted to or aroused by children?
  • Avoid being in the presence of children, staring at them, holding them, and so on.
  • Avoid watching tv shows, movies, pictures, and social media platforms where children are broadcasted.
  • Fearing that a thought or picture would appear during the deed, they avoid sexual connection with themselves and others.
  • Checking that a child is not aroused or drawn to them by doing something appropriate with them (i.e., high-fiving or holding them).
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RELATIONSHIP OCD

People with relationship OCD are unable to endure the ambiguity of close connections, leading to obsessions over the rightness of their relationship and the numerous other options that everyday life presents. They experience obsessions and compulsions related to their intimate relations and feel uncertain about their romantic relationship.

COMMON OBSESSIONS AND COMPULSIONS

 

  • Is this the perfect person for me?
  • Am I compatible with this person?
  • Are we even meant to be together?
  • What if we are not perfect for each other?
  • Taking online relationship questionnaires
  • Looking up other people’s relationships on social media to see if theirs appear to be better

JUST RIGHT OCD

Just Right obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a subtype of OCD marked by obsessive thoughts and repetitive actions centered on organization, perfection, and making things just right.  People with Just Right OCD have persistent ideas about symmetry and order, and they perform particular tasks until they believe it is complete or perfect for example switching a light on and off ten times before leaving a room. While other kinds of OCD are driven by specific concerns and a desire to avoid certain consequences, the underlying anxiety in this subtype is defined by an uneasy sensation that something isn’t quite right.

COMMON OBSESSIONS AND COMPULSIONS

  • Something is wrong with this, and I need to redo it to make it flawless.
  • This doesn’t sit well with me.
  • Acting repeatedly for example closing doors or turning lights on or off
  • Rearranging and reordering things until they seem to be perfect
  • Changing words again and again in an email to make it flawless

CONTAMINATION OCD

Contamination OCD is a typical OCD subtype in which a person is worried about becoming sick or spreading diseases. This overthinking produces severe worry and suffering, which the person attempts to alleviate by compulsive behavior such as frequent cleaning or avoiding busy places.

COMMON OBSESSIONS AND COMPULSIONS

 

  • I have gotten AIDS this time
  • I have made that baby ill as I was holding him
  • This place is full of bacteria’s
  • Handwashing and sanitizing regularly
  • Avoiding public places
  • Avoiding direct contact with children
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RELIGIOUS OCD

Obsessions and compulsions centered on breaching a religious, moral, or ethical conviction are frequent in religious OCD. OCD can be triggered by thoughts of sinning, praying improperly, lying or insulting others, or unintentionally cheating or stealing.

COMMON OBSESSIONS AND COMPULSIONS

 

  • Fear of having a poor faith
  • Fear of burning in hell
  • Afraid of being dirty or unclean as in one’s religion
  • Going more often to religious places than normally a person does
  • Seeking religious leaders for comfort regularly.
  • Performing deeds of self-sacrifice or excessive self-denial.

 

HIT AND RUN OCD

A less commonly mentioned variant of OCD is hit and run OCD, which is defined by a dread of knocking someone over while driving. People with this kind frequently discover that their obsessions prevent them from driving, or that they must retrace their steps to ensure that a road bump was not a person.

COMMON OBSESSIONS AND COMPULSIONS

 

  • Getting stuck in a pothole
  • Hearing neighboring sirens or brake screeches
  • When driving on a busy route or passing a bike or jogger, be cautious.
  • Avoid driving
  • Asking others for a nearby hit and run accident
  • Looking for accidents in news media

VERDICT

Obsessive-compulsive disorder is a serious mental issue that causes severe malfunction and emotional anguish, from ruining your careers to your personal life to your daily activities. OCD may be treated and controlled regardless of the sorts of thoughts or actions it produces. Patients who commit to focused therapy and practice healthy ways of living with and regulating obsessions and compulsions have a positive prognosis.